Forgotten Gardens, Abandoned Landscapes and Remarkable Restorations

Forgotten Gardens, Abandoned Landscapes and Remarkable Restorations
$29.95

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Author: Harris, Shirley
ISBN: 9781894431156
Pub. Date: Jun 1, 2007
Size: 8.00″ x 8.00″
Pages: 248

In the early 1900s, station gardens were part of the welcoming gateway to the travelling public, an introduction to the urbanity of the area and the productiveness of the soil. Today, all that remains of what were once colourful station gardens are a few evergreens, a dishevelled hedge of caraganas and lilacs, and a mystery as to why they exist in these peculiar spots.

This book may rekindle some memories of station gardens, introduce yet another chapter to the lives of the West.s first settlers and answer some questions regarding those remaining, seemingly oddly-placed trees and hedges near the main streets of many communities.
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In the early 1900s, station gardens were part of the welcoming gateway to the travelling public, an introduction to the urbanity of the area and the productiveness of the soil. Today, all that remains of what were once colourful station gardens are a few evergreens, a dishevelled hedge of caraganas and lilacs, and a mystery as to why they exist in these peculiar spots.

This book may rekindle some memories of station gardens, introduce yet another chapter to the lives of the West.s first settlers and answer some questions regarding those remaining, seemingly oddly-placed trees and hedges near the main streets of many communities.
Additional Information

Additional Information

ISBN 9781894431156
Publication Date Jun 1, 2007
Author Harris, Shirley
Illustrator No
Pages 248
Size 8.00″ x 8.00″
Reviews

Customer Reviews 1 item(s)

Manager, CP internal communications
In 1908, CPR established extensive nurseries and gardens at Wolseley, Saskatchewan, to supply trees and shrubs as windbreaks and decorative elements in and around its stations and hotels.

Ultimately, that horticultural endeavour – nurtured primarily by the able hand of transplanted Swede, Gustav A. Bosson Krook – was the source of thousands of indigenous flowers, shrubs and trees that bloomed and flourished in abundance across the Western landscape.

Author Shirley Harris provides a brief, but eloquent survey of gardening on the Canadian Prairies, from the first European explorers to the present gardening putterers and professionals, with a special emphasis on the role that CP played in the promotion of agricultural excellence and the dissemination of seeds, trees and expertise.

This engaging look at an all-but-forgotten aspect of Canadian development includes many archival photographs of CPR station gardens, as well as a series of current views taken at many of the original garden locations.

It will be of particular interest to those familiar with the beautiful and varied landscapes along the CPR tracks through southern Saskatchewan.
Review by Dave Jones / (Posted on 2015-02-21)