Return of the Fearsome Critters

Return of the Fearsome Critters
$12.95

Availability: In stock

Author: James, Warren
Illustrator: McQuarrie, Susan
ISBN: 9781894431262
Pub. Date: Sep 1, 2008
Size: 9.00″ x 6.00″
Pages: 96

If you go out in the woods today...

Don't.

You might get a nasty surprise.

Once upon a time, and not so long ago as that, the vast forests of Canada and the United States were filled with hordes of lumberjacks. The work was hard and dangerous, the living conditions primitive ... but that wasn't the worst of it.

There were things in the woods.

Not the usual menace of grizzly bear, timber wolf or mountain lion.

Something worse. Something much worse.
Description

Details

If you go out in the woods today...

Don't.

You might get a nasty surprise.

Once upon a time, and not so long ago as that, the vast forests of Canada and the United States were filled with hordes of lumberjacks. The work was hard and dangerous, the living conditions primitive ... but that wasn't the worst of it.

There were things in the woods.

Not the usual menace of grizzly bear, timber wolf or mountain lion.

Something worse. Something much worse.
Additional Information

Additional Information

ISBN 9781894431262
Publication Date Sep 1, 2008
Author James, Warren
Illustrator McQuarrie, Susan
Pages 96
Size 9.00″ x 6.00″
Reviews

Customer Reviews 3 item(s)

Resource Links
This book of poetry was inspired by Fear-some Critters of the Lumberwoods With a Few Desert and Mountain Beasts, published in 1910, which described the "fearsome critters" that inhabited the timberwoods of the United States and Canada. As with the descriptions of the critters depicted in the original American folklore tale, invented as a means of explain-ing the challenges and dangers that went hand and hand with the territory, each critter in this book of poetry is described with an accompa-nying illustration and invented Latin classifi-cation. The name of each beast indicates an aspect of its behaviour. For example, the Slide-Rock Bolter, or Agropelter hint at the peril these critters pose. Each humourous or gruesome character is described in creative, rhyming verse and the black and white illustra-tions evoke the turn of the century time period. An acknowledgment at the end of the book credits particular creatures to books by other authors, and a bibliography of a dozen of these books is provided. Some of these titles them-selves might make interesting additions in the legend collection. Review by Moira Kirkpatrick / (Posted on 2015-02-22)
SPG Book Review
Have you heard of the horrible Hodag? Do you know what an Agropelter is? Regina storyteller Warren James has parlayed his interest in cryptozoology into this creative and original book of poems featuring some of the nearly lost creatures of North American folklore.

Each silly poem is preceded by a short encyclopedic entry (complete with pseudo-scientific name!) of the fearsome critter in question. The handsome facing illustrations by Susan Hopkins McQuarrie are reminiscent of Edward Gorey or Maurice Sendak. The whole family will enjoy the spooky illustrations and the amusing and inventive poems.

The poems are clearly meant to be read out loud, the same way that many years ago these stories were told by lamplight. Though the stories began as eerie tales told to frighten unwary greenhorns and travelers, the regrettable lack of gullible greenhorns (and the resultant lack of sightings) meant that these weird and terrifying creatures would have been almost forgotten, if not for the author and his delightful poems.

Take this book camping with you, or read it around the fireplace for an authentic feel. Try not to let yourself wonder… are the fearsome critters really just a story? Or do they only want us to think that?
Review by Shanna Mann (SPG) / (Posted on 2015-02-21)
SPG Book Review
Have you heard of the horrible Hodag? Do you know what an Agropelter is? Regina storyteller Warren James has parlayed his interest in cryptozoology into this creative and original book of poems featuring some of the nearly lost creatures of North American folklore.

Each silly poem is preceded by a short encyclopedic entry (complete with pseudo-scientific name!) of the fearsome critter in question. The handsome facing illustrations by Susan Hopkins McQuarrie are reminiscent of Edward Gorey or Maurice Sendak. The whole family will enjoy the spooky illustrations and the amusing and inventive poems.

The poems are clearly meant to be read out loud, the same way that many years ago these stories were told by lamplight. Though the stories began as eerie tales told to frighten unwary greenhorns and travelers, the regrettable lack of gullible greenhorns (and the resultant lack of sightings) meant that these weird and terrifying creatures would have been almost forgotten, if not for the author and his delightful poems.

Take this book camping with you, or read it around the fireplace for an authentic feel. Try not to let yourself wonder… are the fearsome critters really just a story? Or do they only want us to think that?
Review by Shanna Mann (SPG) / (Posted on 2015-01-17)